You need to know what's on the cutting-edge of technology. Find out what's coming and the unique Warptest POV with just one click on the "Blog" tile.

All posts tagged Swarm

Augmented Reality Is Content…

Augmented Reality and by extension Virtual and Mixed Reality are the new content. Content is king. We’ve all heard it and read it multiple times over the last decade.

Content about us or our brand has an impact both positive and negative, often spreading virally.

Augmented Reality presents new challenges in how we manage and maintain our brand or reputation.

Ownership Issues

Augmented Reality is often location based. Just look at Pokemon Go, Snapchat / Instagram Location Based Stories and others. In the past, if content was written about you, your brand or physical site of your company, it was all about where it was hosted (blogs, social media, even video or Yelp reviews) but the big change with Augmented Reality is that the content is at your location and short of banning the use of apps or smartphones onsite, anyone can create AR content that is tied irrevocably to your location.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Museums and art galleries are experiencing a reality where anyone can add digital content to them. Imagine the scenario where someone either creates an inappropriate or unwanted AR. Control of the ether has flown the coop.

Some see this as a positive transformation, but the big question is, how do you curate this content? In fact, can a museum, gallery or any other private or public entity claim ownership of the location base for the content added as an AR?

Does a museum etc even have any direct redress opposite the app developers to have reputation damaging AR removed? Imagine a politician running a campaign and his opposition creating an AR at his campaign HQ or his next speaking venue. What if the location is controversial and Augmented Reality added by visitors contains strong or equally controversial opinions.

The idea behind Augmented Reality as an immersive, additional layer of rich data that offers an experience we wouldn’t otherwise get is a powerful one. AR apps are not just about social media but also useful in industry, education and can contribute to a museum experience. With ARKit and ARCore our smartphones make it easier for us to create and consume AR content but with great power, comes great responsibility. Or does it in this case? Is the genie simply out of the bottle?

The Warptest POV

Instagram as an example is something we can be calmer about. In paying homage to Snapchat Stories, Instagram made this content temporary so the damage of a negative or unwanted AR is limited. Prior posts have raised the idea that technological disruption can swiftly become our Frankenstein’s Monster. I’m sure if you read the (example) Snapchat terms and conditions, there are clauses that indemnify the company and they clearly have guidelines for approving “lenses” and geo-filters. Snapchat are only one player in the AR market, Quis custodiet ipsod custodes?

Once again, legislation lags behind innovation. Can Augmented Reality content be considered intellectual property? Does ownership of the location supersede any right to create location base content? Is there even a way for a brand or person to easily monitor their AR reputation?

Museums and others like them will have to find solutions to this issue. This is a huge opportunity. An opportunity for the app creators to deliver a solution for searching locations for this Augmented Reality content. As for an appeal process for owners to claim their location and be able to request that apps take down hostile, offensive or other allegedly inappropriate content, search engines offer a similar solution so why not?

Third party developers may be able to develop a reputation management solution if these AR platforms offer an API that supports this.

Here’s a free suggestion for you Dennis, Swarm (formerly the app known as Foursquare) displays photos of check-in locations why not similarly offer AR for the check-in?

Augmented Reality - Swarm app

The real opportunity is for us to use location based Augmented Reality constructively.

We seem to have failed somewhat with Facebook, Twitter and other social networks, let’s not fail with Augmented Reality.

Foursquare Pilgrim SDK Launched…

Dennis Crowley and the team at Foursquare launched Foursquare Pilgrim SDK a few weeks ago. The SDK grants app developers the ability to integrate the location powerhouse’s technology directly into their app.

What more do you need to know than that? In a week where Mobile World Congress failed to wow us, Foursquare did what they have done several times in the past. They went into stealth mode and demonstrated why they own the location app & data markets.

Who Is Foursquare?

The company started out competing for social location and recommendations, gamifying their app with check-ins garnering badges, leaderboards and mayorships of venues.

When the location market seemed tapped out, they split their app in two: Swarm for the check-ins and Foursquare for venue recommendations.

As Foursquare iterated into the commercial market, it became apparent that they had leveraged the big data behind their apps into the biggest consumer behavior database on the planet. Companies like Microsoft were interested in investing which sent Yahoo looking for competitive locational search and recommendation with Yelp.

Foursquare launched their API and now Pilgrim SDK enables apps to create personalized user experiences based on actionable location intelligence from within the app.

  • Personalized experiences
  • Tailored recommendations to their tastes
  • On their arrival to your physical location they can receive a curate list of recommendations thru your app
  • Drive foot traffic to brick and mortar locations

Thanks to Foursquare for making this video sharable
I wrote all this the day after Pilgrim SDK was announced but had trouble finishing the post: a combination of busy work schedule and I just felt the post was lacking punch.

A couple of weeks after I participated in a thread on Facebook where journalist Mike Butcher questioned the future of Foursquare. Foursquare CEO, Dennis Crowley owned the conversation with some winning stats. Then several days ago Entrepreneur magazine posted, After Years of Challenges, Foursquare Has Found its Purpose — and Profits. Proof of the pudding methinks.

Foursquare Pilgrim SDK - FB Mike Butcher

The Warptest POV

Foursquare have repeatedly lulled the tech bloggers and journalists into thinking they were done and then dropped the hammer on something new. Foursquare Pilgrim SDK brings everything that is great about their technology into your apps.

Prediction: we are going to see more big apps providing this kind of embedded / integrated solution.

Where are location apps going next? In the past I’ve posted about Foursquare and where I expected them to go. Here is my latest brainstorm on the subject:

Foursquare Pilgrim SDK - whats next

Anyway, congratulations to Dennis Crowley and the whole Foursquare team. It might be time to start using Swarm and Foursquare apps again.

If you are a developer then you definitely want to have a look at the Foursquare Pilgrim SDK.

Where do you think location apps are going next?