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All posts tagged Github

The Microsoft GitHub Acquisition Is Official …

The Microsoft GitHub purchase is happening. The story leaked before the weekend onto the interwebs and by Monday June 5th, Microsoft and GitHub came clean with their official announcements.

The real loser in all this strangely enough was Apple whose annual WWDC event was fighting for attention online against the pro and anti-acquisition groups. GitHub and their competitor GitLab are more than just collaborative source control. Both have been adding features over the last few years including issue tracking, stories and other features evolving these tools into ALM solutions.

Why would anyone be against Microsoft acquiring GitHub?

After asking this question online, the only coherent, meaningful or logical argument I got was nothing to do with Microsoft and everything to do with any tech giant acquiring one of the most popular collaborative source-code tools on the market. To be fair, no-one should be surprised by this:

Microsoft GitHub - Reasons to be happy

Microsoft had been heavily invested in Git for several years, making it a fundamental option for working in Visual Studio. Meanwhile, everything about the Microsoft GitHub purchase is about mutual benefit but more importantly, increasing value for the Developer Community.

The two other reasons I got out of developers, startup founders, Devops and other were: –

  1. It’s Microsoft. I don’t trust them.
  2. Look at the acquisitions Microsoft ruined.

The counter argument to these were simple; what’s not to trust. Since Satya Nadella took over Microsoft, the company has radically changed. Look at the acquisitions since Satya Nadella took over as CEO. These companies have flourished and grown as part of Microsoft and so have their products e.g. LinkedIn.

If you really want to deep dive the reasons why Microsoft is a totally different company and its context vis a vis GitHub then you can check my video on it:

On the one hand, those against the acquisition are really stuck in the past. On the other, it’s a free market and you can vote with your feet. Tamir Gefen, CEO of ALMToolbox pointed out that this has happened with a major migration to competitor GitLab, who haven’t been shy about pushing how and why you can make the jump. He points to live online graphs of a large upturn in migration onto GitLab from their Grafana:

The graphs show migrations but don’t show some important metrics like: size of repositories, number of accounts moved and from what price bracket these migrations occurred. If the bulk of these are individual developers or people who opted for free accounts then the impact to GitHub will be marginal, other than the bandwidth and API calls being used in these migrations.

The Warptest POV

The Microsoft GitHub acquisition serves to highlight the strategy of Satya Nadella’s Microsoft. This is a break away from the Ballmer era. Microsoft is the biggest Open Source contributor in the world today (including projects like GIT VFS). Microsoft contributes to many projects like Electron and you only really need look at the Microsoft GitHub account to understand the scale of investment in developer hours that led to this purchase being a logical step.

Microsoft’s own online user documentation is held on GitHub repositories. Meanwhile Redmond continues to build more cross-platform apps for mobile than anyone else. They can do this because Visual Studio supports development in most, if not all platforms. Which lead us to other successful acquisitions that were logical steps to bring us this place;the purchase of Xamarin and HockeyApp.

Xamarin has flourished with Microsoft and their former CEO, Nat Friedman will takeover running GitHub following the purchase. HockeyApp has been rebranded and rebuilt by Microsoft as Visual Studio App Center.

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Microsoft is fully aware that they need to earn our trust, even if the days of Vista are over. BUILD 2017 and 2018 showed us that Satya Nadella has placed the Developer Community, in its entirety front and center. Microsoft is a company that listens and continues to innovate, by purchasing companies and technologies that add value for their employees and end users. GitHub was also in talks with Google but at the end of the day opted to move forward with Microsoft.

For what it’s worth. if you don’t have to jump ship from GitHub, then my advice is to be patient and you will see why Microsoft and Satya Nadella have already earned our trust.

One final thought, if Microsoft now has Xamarin, HockeyApp and GitHub. What impact is this going to have on Visual Studio TFS in the future?

Microsoft GitHub - Keep Calm

Whatever happens. Keep calm and carry on Git Pushing.

Atlassian Bought Trello For $425 million…

With Atlassian announcing the big Trello news today, should you be backing up your tickets and looking for another Agile style task management app?

Originally the brainchild of Fog Creek Software and their owner, Joel Spolsky forged their own path and became an independent company.

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Arguably the most popular of the ticket / post-it style web apps for managing tasks, Trello delivered an intuitive, lightweight solution for those tired of kludgy, unwieldy tools.

Atlassian, the company behind Jira and a slew of other products can be considered the market leader in ALM (Application Lifecycle Management) software both on local servers and the cloud.

So, If Atlassian already has Jira, a powerhouse application for managing projects why would they buy it?

Trello was the go-to option for small companies with a lean perspective and strong Agile methodologies.

Is Trello a “buy it to kill it” acquisition?

There Are No Magic Bullets In The Land of ALM

Trello is by no means a perfect standalone solution for managing your product lifecycle. It does task management well, has some really strong integrations like Slack but compare it to solutions like Github or Gitlab and it falls short.

Github and Gitlab have been in competition to deliver a lightweight, easy to implement, comprehensive ALM solution and they started from the other end of the lifecycle. Both Git (source code) repository management tools. Github has evolved with a wide range of integrations and both now include:

  • Web application for user access and management
  • Issue Tracking
  • Agile Ticket Board
  • Wiki / web pages for individual projects

Trello - githubTrello - gitlab

In a nutshell both companies are fighting hard to be the one-stop ALM cloud solution. Trello meanwhile, created a strong product that integrates with others and offered strong competition to Atlassian’s toolset. Especially Jira but, both have a major shortcoming: companies grow out of them too fast. Gitlab needs to play catch up with their feature set.

If Microsoft Team Foundation Server (TFS) with its Test Manager and full Visual Studio integration is a high-end boom-box stereo; then Jira and the associated Atlassian products are akin to a stackable, component stereo.

The Warptest POV

At the end of the day, the ALM solution you select must match your requirements, budget and technical ability. If you are a bootstrapped startup, used to doing things fast then your needs are very different from an established company with several products / projects.

To answer the original question, will Atlassian kill off Trello? Absolutely not.

Atlassian need a lightweight, lean alternative to compete with the Github / Gitlab ALM marketshare. Expect Trello to receive some tight integration with Bitbucket and Confluence. How will Atlassian address the problem that Trello doesn’t handle Issue Tracking well?

If Atlassian changes one thing in Trello it will to add Issues as subtasks of Tickets or create some form of permalink between the two. Trello tickets = stories and Issues or bugs will have an indexable, searchable relationship.

Atlassian will be able to box in both the heavyweight and lightweight arena. Or do you think it’s time to backup your Trello projects?