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All posts tagged Coffee

I had my first cup of coffee when I was 25 and that was it.

It was a cold rainy day, early morning, in the desert. I was on a training exercise with the Army and we had stopped our jeep for a break. One of the guys fished out a small gas stove, a tin pot and made Turkish Coffee with cardamom. He offered me a small glass full of coffee and a heaped spoon of sugar and I took my first sip. The rest as they say, is history.

As a Manchester boy, I grew up in a house where a nice hot cuppa tea was the staple. Usually PG Tips. Coffee in the 70’s, 80’s and even 90’s in England was Nescafe if you were lucky, and had no attraction at all.

After tasting my first strong, black, rich Turkish coffee I knew I needed to try more real coffee, and nothing with foam, frothed milk, syrups, flavourings; just shots of the good stuff. I tried espresso and I was totally hooked. Suddenly I was in a meaningful relationship with ground, brewed beans.

Luckily I lived in Israel, a country which takes its coffee seriously. This maybe one of the few issues the whole Middle East can agree on.

Over the last few months I’ve graduated from grinding store-bought coffee beans to getting interested in home roasting.

Home roasted coffee - software tester 1

Software Testing and Coffee Roasting?

As a software tester I approach new projects with research; online and word of mouth. I discovered that for the “hobbyist” the best start is to either use a pan on the gas or better a popcorn popper. As I’ve written in the past, testing is improved when it becomes like kata.

Of course, the beans are everything. I planned the following: –

Keep a note of all tests and test results: I used Microsoft Office for this (see the table below)

 

  1. Make a list of available green (unroasted beans)
  2. Test the quantity of beans in the popcorn popper that produce optimum results
  3. Make sure all beans are bought equally fresh (as much as you can) and stored the same way. Fresh = flavor.
  4. Define optimum results: evenly roasted, the coffee bean oil still present on the beans, no burnt taste. All beans ground for 11 seconds in the same Bosch coffee grinder.

The popcorn popper has a functional constraint, after 3 minutes or if overloaded it would overheat and shut down until it cooled off.

Bean

2:00 min

75 grams

2:30 min

75 grams

3:00 min

75 grams

2:00 min

150 grams

2:30 min

150 grams

3:00 min

150 grams

Kenya AA

Sumatra

Costa Rica

Colombia

Brazil

Ethiopia

Why do I mention these constraints? The last time I roasted I was in a hurry and overloaded the popcorn popper. It subsequently shut off to cool down at 1:45 min. The beans were under roasted so I siphoned off half into my cast iron skillet, turned on the gas and roasted half in the skillet for another minute and the rest in the popcorn popper when it cooled down and would restart.

The Warptest POV

If the popper is science, using the skillet is an art. You are roasting the curve of the bean against the flat skillet. It heats up to a higher heat and roasts quicker. You need to keep the beans moving and flip them over to get an even roast.

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By comparison, using the skillet gave better results. You can see exactly what’s happening in the skillet whereas the popcorn popper has a translucent, orange cover.

As for the beans, I got a better espresso from the Kenya AA but, that’s always been my favorite. Family and friends have been treated to espressos, cappuccinos, iced coffees and the ubiquitous Israeli Hafuch when visiting.

My plan is to finish the Sumatra and order Puerto Rican or Colombian green beans next and keep on testing. One thing, home roasting is seductive in its own way. I’ve found myself on Amazon and specialty coffee sites absentmindedly pondering 5kg bean roasters and bulk coffee grinders.

When I find my perfect roast I’ll be sure to let you know.